eBooks :: Kembali

eBooks :: Kembali

Judul Queering families: the postmodern partnerships of cisgender women and transgender men
Nomor Panggil e20470571
Pengarang
Subjek
Penerbitan Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017
Kata Kunci transgender · lgbt · families · partnership · couples · families · sex · sexuality ·
 Info Lainnya
Sumber Pengatalogan LibUI eng rda
Tipe Konten text (rdacontent)
Tipe Media computer (rdamedia)
Tipe Carrier online resource (rdacarrier)
Deskripsi Fisik 288 pages
Tautan http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/view/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199908059.001.0001/acprof-9780199908059?rskey=QXJxnU&result=1
  • Ketersediaan
  • File Digital: 1
  • Ulasan
  • Sampul
  • Abstrak
  • Tampilan MARC
Nomor Panggil No. Barkod Ketersediaan
e20470571 02-18-194473129 TERSEDIA
Ulasan:
Tidak ada ulasan pada koleksi ini: 20470571
A feminist sociologist by training, Carla A. Pfeffer studies women whose boyfriends and husbands have not always been recognized as men in the world. The transgender partners of the women Pfeffer interviews often-but not always-take testosterone and/or pursue masculinizing surgeries in order to bring their bodies and others views of them into greater alignment with their identities as men. This, however, may present a unique dilemma for their nontransgender (or cisgender) women partners, many of whom self-identify as lesbian or as queer. The women Pfeffer interviews describe being suddenly perceived as part of an unremarkably heterosexual couple once their transgender partners are recognized by others as men. This may result in social advantages such as inclusion in family gatherings, greater social acceptance by strangers, and the ability to join regulated social institutions. However, these women also describe feeling invisible as they are pushed out of gay and lesbian social spaces and sometimes left unsure of how to describe their own sexual identities and the relationships they have with their transgender partners. In this gripping set of narrative accounts, Pfeffer urges readers to rethink their assumptions about just who and what gets to count as a real family in the 21st century. Moreover, she considers what might be learned through closer attention to (and awareness of) various postmodern reconfigurations of embodiment, families, partnerships, and identity that may bring new meanings to contemporary social life not just for the partners of transgender people, but for everyone.
004
0209780190656355
022
040LibUI eng rda
041eng
049[02-18-194473129]
053[02-18-194473129]
082
090e20470571
100Pfeffer, Charla A., author
110
111
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245|a Queering families: the postmodern partnerships of cisgender women and transgender men |c Carla A. Pfeffer
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250First edition
260
260|a Oxford |b Oxford University Press |c 2017
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300288 pages
310
321
336text (rdacontent)
337computer (rdamedia)
338online resource (rdacarrier)
340pdf
362
490Sexuality, identity, and society series
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502
504
515
520A feminist sociologist by training, Carla A. Pfeffer studies women whose boyfriends and husbands have not always been recognized as men in the world. The transgender partners of the women Pfeffer interviews often-but not always-take testosterone and/or pursue masculinizing surgeries in order to bring their bodies and others views of them into greater alignment with their identities as men. This, however, may present a unique dilemma for their nontransgender (or cisgender) women partners, many of whom self-identify as lesbian or as queer. The women Pfeffer interviews describe being suddenly perceived as part of an unremarkably heterosexual couple once their transgender partners are recognized by others as men. This may result in social advantages such as inclusion in family gatherings, greater social acceptance by strangers, and the ability to join regulated social institutions. However, these women also describe feeling invisible as they are pushed out of gay and lesbian social spaces and sometimes left unsure of how to describe their own sexual identities and the relationships they have with their transgender partners. In this gripping set of narrative accounts, Pfeffer urges readers to rethink their assumptions about just who and what gets to count as a real family in the 21st century. Moreover, she considers what might be learned through closer attention to (and awareness of) various postmodern reconfigurations of embodiment, families, partnerships, and identity that may bring new meanings to contemporary social life not just for the partners of transgender people, but for everyone.
533
534
536[Damas 2017]
546
590
650Transgender; LGBT; Families; Partnership
653transgender; lgbt; families; partnership; couples; families; sex; sexuality
700
710
711
850
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856http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/view/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199908059.001.0001/acprof-9780199908059?rskey=QXJxnU&result=1
866
900[31/07/2018]
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