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Judul From empire to humanity: the American revolution and the origins of humanitarianism
Nomor Panggil e20470583
Pengarang
Subjek
Penerbitan Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016
Kata Kunci United States history · United States revolution · humanitarianism · Great Britain history · British West Indies British history · social reformers · political activists · physicians · imperialism · cosmopolitanism · philanthropy · American revolution · American independence · medical philanthropy · Atlantic world · slavery · British empire · strangers ·
 Info Lainnya
Sumber Pengatalogan LibUI eng rda
Tipe Konten text (rdacontent)
Tipe Media computer (rdamedia)
Tipe Carrier online resource (rdacarrier)
Deskripsi Fisik xi, 314 pages : illustration
Tautan http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/view/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190240356.001.0001/acprof-9780190240356?rskey=7sQynA&result=1
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e20470583 02-18-678658424 TERSEDIA
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From Empire to Humanity: The American Revolution and the Origins of Humanitarianism tells the story of a generation of American and British activists who transformed humanitarianism as they adjusted to being foreigners in the wake of the American Revolution. In the decades before the Revolution, Americans and Britons shared an imperial approach to charitable activity. Growing up in the increasingly integrated British Atlantic world, future activists from the British Isles, North America, and the Caribbean developed expansive outlooks and connections. For budding doctors, this was especially true. American independence put an end their common imperial humanitarianism but not their transatlantic ties, their far-reaching visions, or their belief that philanthropy was a tool of statecraft and reconciliation. In the postwar years, with doctor-activists at the forefront, they collaborated in medical philanthropy, antislavery, prison reform, poor relief, educational charities, and more. The nature of their cooperation, however, had changed. No longer members of the same polity, the erstwhile compatriots adopted a universal approach to their beneficence as they reimagined bonds with people who were now legal strangers. The basis of renewed cooperation, universal benevolence could also be a source of tension. With the new wars at the end of the century, activists optimistic cosmopolitanism waned while their practices endured.
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0209780190240387
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040LibUI eng rda
041eng
049[02-18-678658424]
053[02-18-678658424]
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090e20470583
100Moniz, Amanda B., author
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245|a From empire to humanity: the American revolution and the origins of humanitarianism |c Amanda B. Moniz
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250First edition
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260|a Oxford |b Oxford University Press |c 2016
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300xi, 314 pages : illustration
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336text (rdacontent)
337computer (rdamedia)
338online resource (rdacarrier)
340pdf
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520From Empire to Humanity: The American Revolution and the Origins of Humanitarianism tells the story of a generation of American and British activists who transformed humanitarianism as they adjusted to being foreigners in the wake of the American Revolution. In the decades before the Revolution, Americans and Britons shared an imperial approach to charitable activity. Growing up in the increasingly integrated British Atlantic world, future activists from the British Isles, North America, and the Caribbean developed expansive outlooks and connections. For budding doctors, this was especially true. American independence put an end their common imperial humanitarianism but not their transatlantic ties, their far-reaching visions, or their belief that philanthropy was a tool of statecraft and reconciliation. In the postwar years, with doctor-activists at the forefront, they collaborated in medical philanthropy, antislavery, prison reform, poor relief, educational charities, and more. The nature of their cooperation, however, had changed. No longer members of the same polity, the erstwhile compatriots adopted a universal approach to their beneficence as they reimagined bonds with people who were now legal strangers. The basis of renewed cooperation, universal benevolence could also be a source of tension. With the new wars at the end of the century, activists optimistic cosmopolitanism waned while their practices endured.
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536[Damas 2017]
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650United States -- History -- Revolution, 1775-1783 -- Social aspects; United States -- History -- Revolution, 1775-1783 -- Influence; Humanitarianism -- United States -- History -- 18th century; Humanitarianism -- Great Britain -- History -- 18th century; Humanitarianism -- West Indies, British -- History -- 18th century; Social reformers -- History -- 18th century; Political activists -- History -- 18th century; Physicians -- Political activity -- History -- 18th century; Imperialism -- Social aspects -- History -- 18th century; Cosmopolitanism -- History -- 18th century
653United States history; United States revolution; humanitarianism; Great Britain history; British West Indies British history; social reformers; political activists; physicians; imperialism; cosmopolitanism; philanthropy; American revolution; American independence; medical philanthropy; Atlantic world; slavery; British empire; strangers
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856http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/view/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190240356.001.0001/acprof-9780190240356?rskey=7sQynA&result=1
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